The 2021 Chinese New Year Is Here With A Promise Of Hope And New Beginnings!

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Chinese New Year

The Chinese New Year is the most important festival in China. Incidentally, it is also called the Lunar New Year or the Spring Festival. This is when families spend time together after weeks of intense work with a week’s worth of holidays. Interestingly, the Chinese New Year fell today, i.e., the 12th of February 2021. The New Year marks the start of yet another year- this time it being the ox. The public holiday in China will be celebrated from the 11th of February to the 17th of February. 

Quick Facts About The Chinese New Year

The entire week is just about decorations for the upcoming year. Most families are exuberant about the dinner on New Year’s Eve- a time for a family to be together. They watch the skies littered with fireworks, firecrackers, along with red envelopes. 

Chinese New Year

The Dates Of The Chinese New Year

The calendar of the moon determines when the New Year in China would fall without a schedule. Usually, the holiday is situated on the lunar cycle that succeeds the winter solstice. It is to be noted that although they look for the second new moon, the New Year date is always different when looked at from the view of the Gregorian calendar. Nonetheless, the dates are fixed between the 21st of January and the 20th of February.

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The Year of The Ox

In the traditional astrology of China, today is one of their most significant dates. According to reports, for most people, their year begins today- not on the 1st of January. As far as the lunar calendar goes, today marks the initiation of the Year of the Ox. On the 1st of February, 2022, the year of the Ox would give way to the Year of the Tiger. 

The Chinese New Year As A Spring Festival

Although the Chinese New Year falls in Winter- throughout China, at least, it is often referred to as the Spring Festival. This is simply because the year starts on the day which is supposed to mark the end of winter- and heralds Spring. This symbolizes the craving for a new life and the representation of a completely fresh year on the calendar of the Moon. 

Chinese New Year

Greetings On The Chinese New Year

If you meet someone today, the most famous greeting that you could offer them for the Chinese New Year is Kung Hei Fat Choi. This is a phrase in Cantonese that translates to ‘Greetings, Be rich.’

The History Behind The Chinese New Year

With the Chinese civilization being one of the world’s oldest civilizations, it is no surprise that the Chinese New Year has been around for over 3000 years. Most of the celebrations that take place on the Lunar New Year is usually a celebration of both earth and heaven. And as we are well aware, this is something that has been going on for centuries.

Chinese New Year

Yet, one can’t deny the impact of modernity on this religious tradition- for, with time, newer celebrations have been added to the entire festival. There were also times when the Lunar New Year symbolized hope. In 1967 the entire country was massively debt-ridden. Under Communist rule, the one thing China could do was wish each other and themselves well. But now, people tend to go out and eat and enjoy this day to its fullest.

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Main Events For The Spring Festival

It goes without saying that there are a few traditions that have stood the test of time- and are still going in full force. People usually decorate their houses as well as their professional workplace. Families spend time together, eating, and making merry. Also, this is the time for gift-giving, so you would definitely find people giving red envelopes to each other. 

The Chinese New Year symbolizes hope and the rejuvenation of a new life. What needs to be seen is if this life can be made better throughout the year.

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